Author: adownie (page 2 of 3)

Brighter Bungo this Sunday, Sep 25th

bb-september-2016Brighter Bungo

Your next chance to make Strathbungo that little bit brighter.

Join Alan and his team for a couple of hours tidying up. All necessary equipment supplied.

Meet at corner of Nithsdale Road & Moray Place, from 11am to 1pm.

Sunday 25th September 2016.

Strathbungo Society AGM

Note for your diaries; the Society AGM will be on Tuesday 25th October. More details to follow at bungoblog.com.

Brighter Bungo @ Moray Place this Sunday!

The next Brighter Bungo will be the weekend before Bungo in the Back Lanes, so everything looks spick and span.

However this coming Sunday, 5th June, we will be out trimming the vegetation on the railway side of Moray Place for a third time. This time we will concentrate between Queen Square & Regent Park Square, although we may do more if we have the volunteers. The council will deliver a cage in Moray Place in advance to aid clearing up; please don’t obstruct it. Bring loppers, spades, wheelbarrows, etc between 11 and 1 and give us a hand!

Hope to see you there.

Andrew & Stephen at Marywood Square

Two hours of hard work, and it took a council bulldozer to remove it.

Mar 13th: Three hours of hard work, and it took a council bulldozer to remove it!

Now Pay Attention 007

The latest Strathbungo newsletter includes the curious discovery that Q, James Bond’s favourite quartermaster, was actually a former Strathbungo resident. The story comes courtesy of the Herald, and the sharp eyes of local resident David Cook.
russia

Imagine the curtains twitching back in 1956 when the CID called at 17 Regent Park Square. They wanted to question the licence-holder of a revolver matching the gun used by one of Scotland’s most notorious serial killers. Geoffrey Boothroyd, a young technical rep at ICI, told them that his gun was actually down south being illustrated for the cover of Ian Fleming’s next James Bond novel, From Russia with Love.

That old excuse…

And it was true. Boothroyd, a gun collector, had written to Fleming earlier that year to say that Bond’s .25 Beretta was “really a lady’s gun”. He suggested instead a manly Smith & Wesson .38. Little did he know that it was also the weapon of choice for one Peter Manuel, then on a murderous spree that would claim seven lives, the last three in Burnside.

The detectives eventually got their man and Manuel got justice at the end of a rope. Boothroyd and Fleming continued their friendly correspondence. At the end of From Russia with Love, Rosa Klebb managed to stab Bond with her famous boot, partly because his Beretta got caught in his holster.

In his next novel, Dr No, Fleming included a whole chapter in which Bond was introduced by M to the armourer, Major Boothroyd. He confiscated Bond’s Beretta – “Ladies’ gun, sir” – for a Walther PPK, with the Smith & Wesson Centennial Airweight .38 revolver as back up. A new holster was also recommended, and all was based closely on Geoffrey Boothroyd’s advice. Daniel Craig still uses the Walther PPK to this day.

Oddly the character Q never appeared in Fleming’s novels; he only referred to Q Branch, suppliers of gadgets. Major Boothroyd appeared just the once, and it wasn’t clear he was from Q Branch either.

Boothroyd himself became firearms consultant for Dr No, the first Bond movie, and also advised on such matters as how to set an ocean on fire – no doubt his work at ICI came in handy. Peter Dawson played Major Boothroyd in the movie version of the above scene from Dr No.

It was only in the second movie, From Russia with Love, that Major Boothroyd also became known as Q, and was played famously by Desmond Llewellyn, in that movie and for the subsequent 36 years.

Geoffrey Boothroyd was quite an eccentric who once told Fleming: “I cherish a dream that one day a large tiger or lion will escape from the zoo or a travelling circus and I can bag it in Argyll Street.” That never happened, but he went on to become one of the world’s leading authorities on shotguns and handguns.

The Herald, October 2015: The article that prompted this story

Letters of Note: Fleming’s reply to Boothroyd’s original letter, addressed to 17 Regent Park Square

The Guns of James Bond – BBC Archive: Mr Boothroyd himself, in a 1964 short presented by Sean Connery, explaining his reasoning behind his choice of weapons. The film appears to have been shot inside his Strathbungo home; although by this time he had moved from 17 to 11 Regent Park Square, where he lived from 1956 to 1971. A recent resident of No 11 recalls his parents purchasing  the house from the Boothroyds, and remembers the house being full of weapons, including a Gatling gun in the living room. Does the current resident recognise it?

I am slowly amassing a history of Strathbungo, including stories of former residents of note such as this. If you have any stories to tell, or wish to know more about your own home, please get in touch. One day I hope it will all make it onto the blog.

(Updated 14/3/2016)

Brighter Bungo – This Sunday 10th Jan, 11am

Alan Dobson is organising the latest Strathbungo Volunteer Clean Up this Sunday. Your support would be greatly appreciated, as always. Please meet at the corner of Nithsdale Road and Moray Place (Sammy Dows) at 11.00am. Equipment and training will be provided, as will tea, coffee & shortbread, with any luck!

To add to the fun, a small gang (Andrew & Stephen) intend to have a go at clearing some of the overgrowth through the Moray Place fence. Anyone willing to help out with this would be most welcome. If you have tools (loppers, rakes, shovels, wheelbarrows) or are a dab hand with a petrol hedge trimmer, even better.

BB Poster Jan 2016

Network Rail Update

A quick update on what is happening. Kevin Kane, Chair of The Strathbungo Society, wrote to Network Rail with a number of queries, and a request for a meeting.

Strathbungo Society letter to NR 021215

NR Questions 2 Dec 2015

The following reply was received on 7 December. A date has not yet been set, but hopefully soon. We’ll keep you informed.

Dear Kevin,

Thank you for your email – yes I can confirm receipt of your previous correspondence. I have discussed this with colleagues on Friday and I will develop a response to the points raised.

It would be most helpful if you could confirm if you are my main point of contact? I have received correspondence from a number of different residents on this matter and to progress discussions I think it would be beneficial if there was one central point of contact for the Strathbungo Society. We will of course respond to all queries raised however one point of contact representing the Strathbungo Society would be most helpful.

In relation to the proposed meeting – which we are of course happy to attend –we feel that this should be focused on Moray Place and ensure a resolution on this matter before reviewing Darnley Road.

If you would like to discuss any of these points further please let me know – happy to chat on the phone or over email. As you will appreciate we are very keen to find an appropriate solution to this fencing.

Kind regards,

Niamh

Niamh Hegarty | Senior Public Affairs Manager Scotland (acting) | 07739 786754

Network Rail Fencing Update

Green powder coated fencing, as proposed by Network Rail for Moray Place

Green powder coated fencing, as proposed by Network Rail for Moray Place

The saga of Network Rail’s attempt to erect a prison style weldmesh security fence along the length of Moray Place continues. In September the Society wrote to Niamh Hegarty, Senior Public Affairs Manager at Network Rail Scotland, expressing two main concerns, firstly that security fencing was wholly inappropriate, being in a conservation area, and directly in front of residents’ homes, and secondly that Network Rail insisted the fence would be on their boundary, but that they didn’t know where that was. Their assumption that it is the bow topped metal fence on the kerb is, in our view, incorrect. We provided historical evidence to support this in our letter. The letter is included here for your information.

15 09 09 Network Rail Letter.

Network Rail have finally replied, suggesting concessions on the design of the fence would be costly, and that they still intend to place the fence on the road edge. They claim to provide evidence to back this up, and are mildly threatening about residents’ counter claims, suggesting the residents’ official land registry entries are trumped by their in-house map. We, on the other hand, note the land registry entries are representative only, and the true boundary is set further back from the road in a single straight line.

15 11 06 Letter to Strathbungo Society. Click to read Network Rail’s reply. Their supporting evidence appears below.

Strathbungo Disposition 1858. This 1858 Disposition describes the land they own, but contains little detail.

This is an extract from the map in the disposition detailing their boundary in Strathbungo. Accurate, isn’t it? Compare with the maps in our letter above, which they have ignored.

Map on which they base their claim to knowing the exact location of their boundary

Map on which they base their claim to knowing the exact location of their boundary

Network Rail Modern Map. This document was submitted to us earlier in the year showing Network Rail’s operational map shaded blue. The red boxes are land registry entries for the houses on Moray Place. They now submit it as their land claim, but note that it is their map, and not an official land registry excerpt.

Network Rail have not specified the fencing they intend to use, not set a date for a future meeting. The Society will be meeting shortly to consider how we respond, and we will keep you informed.

Happy reading. If you want to send private comment back to the Society, and / or want us to keep in touch, complete the form here. More general comments for the blog can go in the comments box further down.

Andrew

Bungo at the Bells

Bungo at the Bells 2014

Bungo at the Bells 2014

Thanks to everyone who came along for Bungo at the Bells to welcome in 2014. The weather was kind, it seems a good time was had by all, and some even lasted well beyond 2am, to hear a lovely vocal rendition of Rose Royce’s Wishing on a Star after the music had finished.

Thanks in particular to the Strathbungo Society for supporting the event, Teresa Mooney for doing most of the preparation, the Suttons, Dimmocks and Stephen Lamb for helping dish out the mulled wine and other freebies, the mystery piper of Strathbungo for making another appearance, the second mystery piper for joining in, those who made donations to the Society’s funds, and for those who helped tidy up. One lost mobile has been returned to its owner, but anyone seen a lost earring?

Thanks also to those who said thank you to us – it makes it all the more worthwhile putting the effort in.

Let’s hope 2014 continues in such good form.

 

More pictures here: http://www.flickr.com/groups/strathbungo/pool/

Where on earth…?


 Mystery Building in StrathbungoYou were asked to identify the Strathbungo building below, and its location.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strathbungo Parish Church TodayNow the newsletter is out, I can reveal this was the first Strathbungo Parish Church, built in 1839, but demolished sometime after 1883. The photo dates from around 1879.

The second church was built on the same site, reusing much of the stone, in 1887-88. The facade of the second church still stands on Pollokshaws Road, even though the rest of the church was demolished in 2006. The facade was incorporated into the modern flats. The current view from the same spot is shown on the right.

You can read more about Strathbungo’s church in the newsletter, when it drops through your door, or by downloading it from this blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bin Rakers No More

Bin Raker

You may have noticed the increased presence, and persistence, of the bin rakers of late. In my case, I am fed up of rebagging my rubbish every fortnight before the binmen come, especially when it gets ripped open again during the night. However things reached a nadir last week when I left an electrical cable running out under my garage door for the use of a builder working in the back lane. The rakers cut the cable at both ends and made off with 20m of electrical cable, value probably little more than 50p. In doing so they pulled as much cable under the door as they could, ripping the electrical socket off the wall and leaving mains cabling dangling dangerously in my garage, and cost the builder £20 – it was his cable.

It is time to fight back, albeit legally. I have spoken to the police at Gorbals Police Station (in particular PC Ali Martin) who are aware of the problem, and are keen to identify the culprits. While they are planning plain clothes patrols in the lanes in the next few weeks, we can also help. We need to do more than just move them along, and if you do not wish to intervene, call the police on 101 (the new non emergency number, not 999) immediately. If they have someone free they will come round and try to catch them in the act.

If you feel more proactive, the issue is one of identification; this is best achieved by two collaborating witnesses, and photographic evidence to identify the individual. I almost got a photo of the protagonists last week and regret not doing so. While I have sympathy for those less fortunate than ourselves, it stops when they begin causing criminal damage, and this needs to be nipped in the bud. Happy snapping, but of course, no taking the law into your own hands. It just isn’t the Bungo way.

Strathbungo – The Fabric of Heritage

This article about Strathbungo touches all the usual bases; the history, the architecture, conservation, parking, the back lanes, the railings, the role of the Strathbungo Society, artwork for the roundabout, and perhaps most topical of all as it happens, the effect of HMOs and guest houses on the quality of life in Strathbungo. The only thing it doesn’t seem to mention is the bins!

And the best bit? It appeared in Scottish Field magazine, thirty five years ago. Plus ça change. It was written by the eminent Scottish poet & journalist Maurice Lindsay, who passed away aged 90 in 2008. It contains several historical items of note that were new to me. Happy reading.

The Fabric of Heritage

The Fabric of Heritage p1, Scottish Field Jan 1977

The Fabric of Heritage

The Fabric of Heritage p2, Scottish Field Jan 1977

Thanks to Marie for finding and providing the article. I would love to hear from anyone else who can add their own reminiscences of days gone by in Strathbungo, and add to our burgeoning history collection.

Ref: Maurice Lindsay Obituary

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